Writing Tips

harperquoteAndrew Stanton: The clues to a great story

DEEP POV—What is It? Why Do Readers LOVE It?

Plotting Problems: Episodic Writing

Why You Need a Mentor to Become a Better Writer

How to Give Depth to Your Characters

7 Creative Ways to Create Character Depth

How to Murder a Draft, Resurrect A Better Story

Deep Point of View

Best 5 Ways to Write Deep POV – Character Emotion

discussionquoteReplace the Word ‘Very’ with One of These 128 Modifiers

New List of Habit Words to Avoid

Could We Just Lose the Adverb (Already)?

The Literary Device of Foreshadowing

Is Theme Important in Nonfiction too?The Hero Embodies the Theme

Writing Good Books: The Telegraph reported on scientists who came up with an algorithm that analyzes books and predicts if they will become bestsellers. A team from Stony Brook University in New York used books from Project Gutenberg and found that their algorithm matched the success of the public domain books 84% of the time. Some insights: books with lots of conjunctions, nouns and verbs did well compared to books with more adverbs.

Tell Us What Your Story is About [Continuing the series on Theme in fiction, nonfiction, and movies … ]

The bigger the theme, the more forceful the story’s impact.

“A precise, informative way of expressing how story emerges from the schoolyard bully/nervous kid lurking around every writer.” – Shelly Lowenkopf

“Make Your Hero Suffer” By Steven Pressfield, Part One, Part Two, Part Three, and Part Four.

How to Write a One Sentence Pitch

Learning the Craft By Steven Pressfield

Who’s Telling This Story? And Why? By Shelly Lowenkopf

How to Read Like a Writer

What Does Kill Your Darlings Mean?

“The Good News and the Bad” essay on getting published By Shelly Lowenkopf

breakingnews5 Tips for Writing a Memoir

How to Eliminate “To-Be” Verbs in Writing

The Terrible Twenty Words Not to Use

Seven Tips From Ernest Hemingway on How to Write Fiction

Five Writing Tips From Jane Smiley

Elmore Leonard’s opening lines. What’s your reaction?

Flannery O’Connor’s Eight Rules for Writing

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