Author Archives: lopopolo

No Winner For Pulitzer Prize For Fiction in 2012

In 2012 nobody was good enough. The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction is one of the most prestigious awards in American literature. Previous fiction winners have included Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Jennifer Egan and Philip Roth. Publishers submit works according to … Continue reading

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Weird Writing From Published Authors

On The One Hand … ‘”There is one datum I can adduce, I believe,’ said Lebret, scratching his beard with his left hand and manoeuvring a cigarette out of its case with his left …” (Adam Roberts, Twenty Trillion Leagues … Continue reading

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Thinking of writing your novel in omniscient point of view)? Forget it.

If you’re thinking of writing your novel in omniscient POV (point of view), forget it. Writers who use omniscient POV don’t challenge themselves to write in a more intimate style, which takes more work and thought. In first person or … Continue reading

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The Burden of Your Novel’s Opening Scene by C. S. Lakin

Think of your novel as a gold mine, with a mother lode resting deep in the heart of a mountain. In order to get to that treasure, you have to build a sturdy framework as you dig into all that … Continue reading

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David Farland’s Daily Kick in the Pants—Telescoping Penetration

“One book that I frequently recommend for writers is Orson Scott Card’s Character and Viewpoint. I do it for a number of reasons. First, Scott looks at such issues as whether to write a novel in first person, second, or … Continue reading

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Some Things You Should Know about Story (Six, to Be Precise)

By Shelly Lowenkopf (1) Whose story is it? A dramatic work has only one central character. There may be secondary characters of equal importance to the overall narrative, but in the vast majority of literary accomplishments from Dracula to Candide, … Continue reading

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David Farland’s Daily Kick in the Pants–Predicting a Bestseller

Researchers created a computer program to study stylistic similarities between books, to see if stylistic similarities can be used as predictors of success. Read what David Farland said about their findings.

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